NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF UKRAINE
State Museum of Natural History
Biodiversity Data Centre

Athyrium filix-femina (L.) Roth

Synonym
  • Polypodium filix-femina L.
  • Asplenium filix-femina (L.) Bernh.
  • Polypodium filix-femina L.
  • Asplenium rhaeticum (L.) Brügger
  • Athyrium alpestre Clairv.
  • Athyrium azoricum Fée
  • Polypodium axillare Aiton
  • Polypodium rhaeticum L.
Vernacular Name
Lady Fern, Common Lady-fern
Images
Conservation status
No status defined
Value of species
Remarks
Detail
Occurrence: Ab(A), AE(G), Ag, Al, Ar, Au(A, L), Az(C, F, G, J, L, M, P, S, T), Be(B, L), BH, Bl, Br, Bu, By, Ca(C, G, H, P, T), Cg, Co, Cr, Cs, Ct, Da, Es, Fa, Fe, Ga(C, F), Ge, Gg(D), Gr, Hb(E, N), He, Ho, Hs(A, S), Hu, Is, It, La, Le, Lt, Lu, Ma, Md(M), Mk, Mo, No, Po, Rf(C, CS, E, N, NW, S), Rm, Sa, Si(S), Sk, Sl, Sr, Su, Tn, Tu(A, E), Uk(K) (EuroMed, 2018). A large, feathery species of fern native throughout most of the temperate Northern Hemisphere, where it is often abundant (one of the more common ferns) in damp, shady woodland environments and is often grown for decoration. Its common names "lady fern" and "female fern" refer to how its reproductive structures (sori) are concealed in an inconspicuous – deemed "female" – manner on the frond. Alternatively, it is said to be feminine because of its elegant and graceful appearance. Athyrium filix-femina is now commonly split into two species, A. angustum (narrow lady fern) and A. asplenioides (southern lady fern). The southern lady fern has a broader frond, especially at the base. Both species are cespitose (the fronds arising from a central point as a clump rather than along a rhizome). The deciduous fronds are light yellow-green, 20–90 centimetres (7.9–35.4 in) long and 5–25 cm (2.0–9.8 in) broad. Sori appear as dots on the underside of the frond, 1–6 per pinnule. They are covered by a prominently whitish to brown reniform (kidney-shaped) indusium. Fronds are very dissected, being 3-pinnate. The stipe may bear long, pale brown, papery scales at the base. The spores are yellow on A. angustum and dark brown on A. asplenioides. A. felix-femina is very hardy, tolerating temperatures as low as −20 °C (−4 °F) throughout its range. The rhizomes and young fronds are poisonous when raw, but edible after cooking.
Book reference
  • Кузярін О.Т. Судинні рослини території торфовища "Білогорща” (м. Львів) // Наукові основи збереження біотичної різноманітності. - 2010. - Т.1(8), №1. - С.75-90.
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Experts
  • Alexander KUZYARIN, Dr, e-mail: kuzyarin@gmail.com

Taxonomic branch

Biota
Eukaryota
Plantae
Viridiplantae
Tracheophyta
Pteridophytina
Polypodiopsida
Polypodiales
Athyriaceae
PARTNERS