NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF UKRAINE
State Museum of Natural History
Biodiversity Data Centre

Bombus hortorum (Linnaeus, 1761)

Synonym
  • Apis hortorum Linnaeus, 1761
  • Apis palludosa Müller, 1766
  • Apis fidens Harris, 1776
  • Bombus meridionalis Dalla Torre, 1879
  • Bombus hispanicus Pittioni, 1939
  • Megabombus asturiensis Tcalcu, 1975
  • Megabombus reinigiellus Rasmont, 1983
Vernacular Name
Small Garden Humble-bee, Garden bumblebee
Images
Conservation status
IUCN: LC
Value of species
Pollinator species
Remarks
Detail
One of 23 species of the subgenus Megabombus. One of 250 world known species of the genus Bombus, and one of 40 bumblebee species in the fauna of Ukraine. Distribution: Palaearctic Region (indigenous distribution in Europe and nothern Asia to the Pacific). Introductions: B. hortorum has been introduced into New Zeland (Gurr, 1957; Macfariane, Gurr, 1995). It occurs in Iceland, where it has also probably been introduced (Prys-Jones et al., 1981). A common medium-sized species, with a long tongue, emerging in late spring, and nesting below the surface of the ground, though sometimes on the surface under objects, above the surface in cavities, or on the surface. It is less often seen in late summer and these records may sometimes be for bees reared in secondary nests by queens produced earlier in the same year. Colonies of this species are small. [[B. hortorum is common in a vast part of the West-Palaearctic region and is mentioned in many articles. In the north of Scandinavia, it extends up to the 70th parallel, but is not found in the tundra. Westward, it has been found in Iceland – where it may have been imported (Prys-Jones et al. 1981) – but not in the Azores, Canary and Madeira Is. To the south, it extends to the latitude of Madrid in the Iberian Peninsula and to Calabria in S. Italy. In Anatolia, the species is common in the north. Eastwards, it extends over the whole Siberian region, to the Ussuri R. and the Altai Mts. South-east, in N. Iran, it reaches the Mazandaran province, but not the Kopet-Dag Mts. It is absent from N. Africa and from the Mediterranean islands, except Corsica, Sicily and, perhaps, Sardinia. B. hortorum has been successfully imported to New-Zealand in 1885. There are several subspecies described, the most conspicuous one being jonghei Rasmont from Corsica, that shows a completely different colour pattern.
Book reference
Experts
  • Iren KONOVALOVA, e-mail: iren@museum.lviv.net

Taxonomic branch

Biota
Eukaryota
Animalia
Eumetazoa
Arthropoda
Hexapoda
Insecta
Hymenoptera
Apidae